A Nerd in The Garden: Lilies

Purple Prince Lily

Lilies and Roses

Lilies and Roses

In the fall we planted several lilies. Lilies are one of my favorite flowers. I had hoped to get some Stargazers to plant as they are beautiful and delightfully fragrant, but I wasn’t able to. I’ll keep an eye out for some Stargazer bulbs for next year.

What I did get were two Purple Prince lilies along with a Cappuccino lily and some others whose names I have forgotten. Of those four are not yet blooming so we will get to enjoy them later on in the season. Currently I have the two Purple Prince lilies in bloom, the Cappuccino lily is done, having bloomed earlier in the spring and another lily is in full bloom but it’s one of the one’s whose name I don’t remember.

Cappuccino Lily

Cappuccino Lily

The Cappuccino lily bloomed first in the early spring and heralded the flowers to come. I love the striking flowers with their dark centers and white edges.

The Purple Prince lilies are “tree” lilies and get very tall. These two specimines are around 5 feet tall, give or take a couple inches. They are wonderfully fragrant and their rich color makes them easily visible in the garden. They stand next to our only red rose: Taboo.

This third lily is very fragrant and I love the colors. It’s in the perfect spot next to the Distant Drums rose.

Lily

Lily

Taboo

Taboo

A Nerd in the Garden – Busy Spring

Spring Tulips

Cappuccino Lily

Cappuccino Lily

last year we spent a couple of months clearing out a lot of weeds and preparing our garden space. We put in 7 raised beds and planted them. We also mulched heavily with hazelnut shells. The mulching worked like a dream. This year there were very few weeds and they were easily pulled. The entire garden space looks neat and well cared for.

We learned also that the squash, pumpkins, zucchini and like vining vegetables will take up all the space they can. We had 20′ vines, possibly even longer. they have been banished to the side yard.

Gunnera

Gunnera

This year we put in two more raised beds and have been cleaning up the side yard. We have a problem with Himalayan Blackberries, which are very thorny and grow very fast. They are all but impossible to get rid of once they have gotten a foothold. Every year we tear out so many sharp thorny vines. The thorns go right through leather gloves. Those are probably the worst of the offenders, although no one told me that Clerodendrums propagate underground so I have to pull some Clerodendrum shoots every year. Likewise catnip. I planted it many years ago, all unaware of its propensity to propagate underground, for the neighborhood kitties. I’ve almost got the catnip out for good but it’s been a battle.

Of course there are the usual suspects too: Dandelions, thistles, broadleaf weeds, clover, various grasses and bindweed. There is a lot of weeding to do and clean up takes a lot of time and effort. It’s very satisfying when it is done though.

Raised Beds

Raised Beds

You may notice the inverted pot on the side of the raised bed. This is to set my sprinkler on. It gets it high enough that I’m not wasting a lot of water watering the sides of the beds and the pathways.

We have a gorgeous garden this year and at long last the flower bed we’ve been putting in the side yard is starting to look like we want it to. The attempt to dig up and move the Crocosmia was unsuccessful. It came back where it was dug up and did not grow where it had been planted. In the fall I will try again.

Rose Taboo, Mallow, Dutch Blue Iris and Crocosmia Lucifer

Rose Taboo, Mallow, Dutch Blue Iris and Crocosmia Lucifer

We planted dutch blue iris and they came up beautifully. Likewise lilies and earlier in the season tulips. The Gunnera is finally thriving. It’s a swamp plant so I have to water it frequently but I love it. We had to mulch it heavily to get it through the winter but it survived and has rewarded us by getting to a height of 4 feet. The leaves are easily 3 feet wide.

Spring Tulips

Spring Tulips

The area will take several years to get all of the weeds out and mulched, since we are doing it ourselves. Sure we could hire professional landscapers and they’d do it in a weekend but it would cost thousands of dollars that we just don’t have. By spreading out our planting, and our clean up and preparation we are dividing the project into manageable chunks and spreading out the cost so that we can pay as we go. It also gives us a chance to correct errors as we learn. Sure it’s going to take years to get this yard looking the way we want it to but it won’t consume too much of our time at one time and it won’t break our budget.

In the fall I planted a lot of tulips and lilies. It was a delight to see the tulips bloom this spring. The lilies are starting to bloom now and will carry through the late spring/early summer. Then the roses will be in full bloom. This year the roses got an early start.

Flower Bed

Flower Bed

Purple Prince Lily

Purple Prince Lily

A Nerd in the Garden loose in the House: Remodeling

Tile and Paint Chips

Demo Begun

Demo Begun

After a long absence from blogging I am back. I do apologize for the derth of posts in the last 6 months, gentle reader. Rest assured things have continued on. The remodel project has grown, along with the budget. Since it’ll take me approximately forever to save up the cold hard cash for all of these projects I’m starting small, prioritizing and shopping for the best deals I can find.

We decided to start on the inside in the bathroom. It was old, 70’s style and small-ish, not tiny but not large either. We’re mostly doing this ourselves so it is very slow going. What it’s costing us in time is saving us quite a bit in labor.

When calculating the budget I also included the design and everything one would generally pay for if they had someone else come in and do the project. There is no reason to ignore design costs just because you are doing your own design–it gives you a more accurate idea of how much money you save by doing certain things yourself.

To calculate the budget I googled the average cost in my area for each piece of the project I’m looking at doing. This gives you a realistic starting point for saving up to have something done without breaking your overall budget.

When starting a remodel it’s wise to figure half again as much of your budget for unexpected surprises. For example in the bathroom, since it hadn’t been remodeled ever and it had all of its original fixtures, and the house was slapped together in a hurry I expected water damage, mold, and the normal things one finds behind the tile in a bathroom. The flooring was cheap linoleum, ugly cheap linoleum, I expected bad things in the floor.

When we pulled the tile off the walls (the only tile in the bathroom was the surround around the bathtub/shower) it had been put on straight drywall, not even backer board for tile. As things go, a very minor surprise but it made us worry about where we might find mold or water damage.

That all being said, we were pleasantly surprised to find very minimal water damage. The floor was pristine, and there were only two spots of damage on a stud. We didn’t even have to replace it the damage was so small–just a little discoloration.

New Tub

New Tub

Since the bathroom is small we chose a tub with shelves for small items like shampoo and conditioner, washcloths, razors, shower gels and the like. Also we have to paint the walls white because white walls makes a space look lager than it is.

We are also going to cut a small shelving unit into the wall. It’ll only be about 5.5 inches deep but we can make it the width of the space between the studs which will give us quite a bit more storage. It’s enough for toilet paper, washcloths, toothpaste and other miscellaneous items that go in a bathroom. We’ll put an illusion door over it so it won’t just be some opening in the wall. It will go behind the door.

Now a stark white bathroom is boring, really, so we are going with black and white marble tile for the floor (and we’re getting proper backer board) and oil rubbed bronze faucets. We are also selecting a trim for around the tub. It should be very modern looking when finished but with the oil rubbed bronze still a bit warm, rather than stark and cold.

Tile and Paint Chips

Tile and Paint Chips

It took quite a bit of searching but I found the tile on super sale, same brand, same style as I had found in a store, and I bought enough for both bathrooms in the house. Even though the next bathroom will have to wait quite a while for the remodel, at least I have the tile and with it being the same as what we’re using in the first bathroom it’ll carry a sense of continuity throughout the house.

This is a work in progress and it’ll likely take several months for us to finish.

A Nerd loose in the house: Home Decorating & Repair/Remodle

Ornaments and lights

Laying out the lights & checking that they work

Laying out the lights & checking that they work

It is the Christmas season and today we hang the lights and ornaments around the house. It’s a week later than I normally do it but things came up last week. I love the big house ornaments. To me there is something festive and joyful about them. Thankfully they are plastic because I dropped two of them three times today trying to get everything situated.

Ornaments and lights

Ornaments and lights

It’s important, once you’ve found the lights from last year, that you lay them out and check that they work. Watch where you step, those glass bulbs look small but when they break they create a pile of shards that rivals Mt. Rainier. Kind of like when you step on a Kix (cereal) in the kitchen. It defies all logic and reason. But I digress. Once you’ve laid out the lights and replaced any nonfunctioning bulbs it’s time to hang them.

One of the best things I ever bought was an extension pole to help hang the lights and ornaments. Before I got the pole I would be climbing my stepladder at every attachment point. My legs would ache the next day. It never helped that I would have to hang them basically twice. The first time I’d either hang them with the plug in end on the wrong side or with too much or too little drape in them. Either way it seems like there are always some adjustments that have to be made.

Now how you hang your lights is a matter of taste. A lot of people like to hang them tight against the line of the eves. I, for reasons I cannot explain, like a bit of a drape about them. The important thing is that you like your decorations. They should bring joy to you and your family. We have a Christmas T-Rex that will be set up next weekend. It’s adorable. Ours is old but here’s one I found for you if you’re interested.

With the weather getting cold it as finally forced me inside until it warms up a bit. Here’s the thing, I have a green thumb outside but inside I cannot keep a plant alive to save the galaxy. It’s a sad thing but that’s how it goes. So indoor gardening is right out for me. After many years of trying to keep indoor plants and watching them slowly die, I have one, singular christmas cactus that seems to survive (I will not say thrive). It blooms every Christmas and I leave it alone to do its thing. I would like to give it some TLC (transplanting to a new pot for example) but I have such a bad track record with indoor plants that I’m afraid to touch it, this is probably what has saved it’s life.

So during the winter months I’ve decided to turn my attention to some much needed home repair. Every home needs maintenance and unless you are related to a handy person or know one with time on their hands, you have to either hire someone to do it or do it yourself. Although I’m not technically handy, I’m willing to learn and I do know the difference between a crescent wrench and an allen wrench as well as a phillips screwdriver and a slotted screwdriver (also I know that a sonic screwdriver is not indicated in this application). So I’m not completely unfamiliar with tools but I’m not far off.

While I am fearless in the garden I hesitate to do anything to the house, due to my lack of knowledge and practice, and it is way past time I get over that hang-up. We will start with something that is mostly labor, because that is the most expensive part of most projects and carries the least amount of risk. So I intend to get up into my attic and clean out the old insulation and debris and lay down new insulation.

Research is a critical component of any project, especially if it is new to you and you are learning as you go. You simply must know what the project will entail and what to expect as far as possible pitfalls. For example, I read that it is best to use a piece of plywood or something to bridge at least 3 of your rafters to prevent falling through your ceiling if you have an unfinished attic. This makes sense but I would have probably tried, and failed, to balance on the beams. So that little bit of reading saved me the added anguish and expense of repairing a me sized hole in my ceiling at some point (and potential injury).

Preparing Roses for the Winter

Pruned and Protected

Rose before being pruned

Rose before being pruned

This weekend generally gets taken up with Holiday goings ons. Between spending time with family and friends and getting ready for Christmas it seems there is next to no time for gardening. That’s ok because the weather has finally turned and it’s getting too cold to be effective in the garden anyway.

I like to wait until the roses are dormant before I prune them back for winter. Pruning them too early runs the risk of them putting a lot of energy into leafing out again only to have the frost hit them hard and stress them, possibly killing them. Also I leave the last round of flowers on the plants to allow them to set seeds and get ready to go dormant.

Christmas Candle

Christmas Candle

There are little grubs that like to chew down through the heartwood of the rose canes to winter over. These will kill a plant if they go too long. To prevent this I break out one of the multitude of unused Christmas candles I have and drip wax on the ends of the stems when I prune them back for winter.

If you don’t have a nice candle that you have no other use for you can use a few drops of white glue mixed with a drop or two of food color to coat the ends of the canes. Both of these methods will keep the larvae out of your canes and protect your roses for the winter.

Pruned and Protected

Pruned and Protected

With the cold weather upon us, I’m done outside for a couple of months. I’m only about a third of the way through all of the weeding I want to do. I’ll just have to pick up in the early spring.

Gift Ideas for the Gardener on Your List

Solar Lights In The Garden

Solar Lights In The Garden

Solar Lights In The Garden

With the holidays almost upon us it might be a good idea to provide some gift ideas for the gardener in your life. The weather outside might be frightful but that doesn’t mean you can’t plan some heartscaping for the garden. Below find some ideas for the garden to fit almost any budget.

Little solar lights transform a garden into a magical wonderland when the sun goes down.

These little lights in the shapes of butterfly, dragonfly and humming bird make an evening on the patio next to the garden a magical and relaxing event. At around $20 for a set of four they are a delightful addition to any garden.

Also this solar light wind chime is very whimsical and would be fun in a garden setting.

But who am I kidding. I discovered something for the garden on Amazon that makes my little nerd heart jump for joy.

Starting off with a little dragon sculpture for your patio wall or really anyplace you think you can wedge him in. This cute little dragon comes in at $40.

The Astronaut at Ease is really fun and would be awesome in any garden or on a desk. It’s turning your garden into a sci-fi adventure! A bit more spendy than the wall dragon at $85 but so much fun.

Ok not necessarily for the garden but this Frost Dragon ornament is gorgeous and at $17 it’s very reasonably priced.

If you have a more practical bent this little garden caddy is always useful and at $10 it won’t break the bank.

These little kneeler pads are a great gift too. As a gardener you are always kneeling down to pull out this or that weed, or check that plant or harvest this or that vegetable and while these may not be glamorous they are incredibly useful. And they’re just $9 on Amazon.

Or there are a variety of raised bed kits which could be a great help to a gardener looking to go to raised beds.

Then there is a motion detecting solar light for gardening just a few minutes later into the evening.

Of course what really takes the cake, not just for wow factor but also for price is this little beauty:

Sure it costs more than $500 but it’s a scale model of an Apatosaurus. That’s amazing.

You can get the more modest Camarasaurus for around $300 or so.

And then there’s this:

Totally awesome with a totally awesome price to match.

Yeah the scale model dinos are expensive but they are unexpected, have an unmatched wow factor and your garden will never be the same.

Cold Weather is Upon Us, Finishing Up For Winter

Second side begun and Elephant Ear plants removed for winter.

Getting Ready for the other side of the walkway

Getting Ready for the other side of the walkway

This may be the last weekend A Nerd In the Garden can actually garden. We’ve gotten cold weather this last weekend. Rain is one thing, a good raincoat will get you through but cold weather is quite another.

The last thing I need to do is prune the roses now that the weather has turned. I try not to prune the last bloom of the roses so that the plants can set fruit and get ready for winter. Then when I’m fairly certain they won’t start leafing out again I do a hard prune to get them ready for winter. I’ll do that and melt candle wax over the cut stems to keep the borers out.

One Side with Elephant Ear plants

One Side with Elephant Ear plants

It had been my intention never to buy a plant that would have to be dug up to winter over. However; I was looking at the growing instructions for the beautiful elephant ear plants I’d put in the side yard and to my dismay, discovered that they shouldn’t be out in weather colder than 50 degrees F. Eeek! It’s been high 40’s for the past couple of weeks at night and now about to get much colder.

So I had to race home from work and quickly, but carefully, dig them out of my garden. They are in buckets in the garage. I hope that stays just warm enough for them. I hesitate to bring them into the house proper but it may come to that.

This weekend I dug up the Crocosima Lucifer and moved the bulbs. That took a lot more work than I had anticipated. I only got 2 clumps done before I had to call it a day. There are at least 3 more clumps to be worked. I’ll just have to move them in the spring. There is still quite a bit of weeding to do too. I’m about 1/3 of the way done with the area I wanted to clear, so around 100 sq ft.

The raised beds for the vegetable garden are just about ready for winter. I wanted to put some landscaping fabric over them but I’m not sure I will.

Second side begun and Elephant Ear plants removed for winter.

Second side begun and Elephant Ear plants removed for winter.

With the Crocosima in place I was able to replant some of the bearded Iris I saved while cleaning the area out. I don’t know what colors are in the box but I know they’ll be beautiful. I’m kind of hoping for a peach one I had blooming in the area years ago is one of the ones that got saved.

Lastly I got started on the east side of the walkway border. I ran out of bricks to do the edging or I would have gone farther. In clearing off the brick walkway I discovered that the west side was around 6 inches to far south and didn’t come all the way up to meet the north edge. I debated leaving it but couldn’t. So I extended the channel a bit and slid each brick up to move the entire run the distance it needed to be flush with the patio.

crocosima bulbs dug, cleaned and ready to replant.

crocosima bulbs dug, cleaned and ready to replant.

Digging through cardboard to plant bulbs

Digging through cardboard to plant bulbs

Vegetable garden ready for winter

Vegetable garden ready for winter

A Nerd In The Garden: Crocosima Lucifer, Carnations and Laying Out Your Flower Bed

Hummingbird in Crocosima

One Month Ago

One Month Ago

In the Garden the soil can be worked right up until the ground freezes. Take care not to compress it too much if it rains and the moisture content gets high enough for that to be an issue. So there is a fine line that has to be maintained when pushing the garden work deep into fall.

As you may recall, gentle reader, I had a section of the front flower bed I really wanted to get weeded out while the soil was soft enough to pull roots and all. That’s fine in theory but even with soft soil, grass roots are difficult. I did the best I could and actually rototilled the area and still there are some very tough and persistent roots that I could not get out.

That’s where the cardboard mulch layer comes it. I only use a single layer and it gets completely soaked and stays soaked for months so it breaks down quickly. Cardboard won’t improve your soil quality but it will kill the majority of weeds. Since I’m battling grass right now that’s my best, least toxic, option aside from digging everything out which I just don’t have the time for. Nor do I want to destroy the slope I’m working on.

Yesterday

Yesterday

I’ve put nice hazelnut shells over a part of the area as a real mulch and I will use my cat’s claw/hoe tool to plant the bulbs right through it. The forecast is calling for rain for the next week and that will soak everything quite nicely. Then I plan on digging up the Crocosima bulbs and planting them on the east side of the bed. That will be quite a job.

The nice thing about the Crocosima is that they will naturalize quite nicely wherever I put them. The bad thing about the Crocosima is that they have naturalized where I tossed them so many years ago.

I had no idea how tall they would get or how much they would spread. I got only 5 little bulbs of Crocosima Lucifer free in an order of tulips or something one year. I did not expect them to become one of the centerpieces of my flower bed. While I am glad they did, now I need to put them in a better place.

That being said, let’s talk about laying out the garden. When I first started this flower bed, lo those many years ago, I took a rather haphazard approach. I planted what caught my eye at the time, wherever I felt like planting it. While there is a certain freedom and whimsy to that approach, I would not recommend it. That is the kind of planting approach that leads to 5′ Crocosima in front of 2′ Bearded Iris and 3′ Gladiolus in front of 6″ Dianthus…um Carnations. And that is what leads, seasons later, to having to replant an entire bed.

Hummingbird in Crocosima

Hummingbird in Crocosima

Either get some graph paper or make some in Excel (it’s super easy to do) and you can plan out where you want to put your flowers, or vegetables if that’s the kind of garden you’re planting. I used graph paper for my raised beds in the back because my space was limited and I wanted to get as many beds as possible.

Last Week

Last Week

I planted a full 4’X 4′ bed of carrots and I’m loving just going out and pulling a few out of the bed whenever I need them. It’s going to be gorgeous to have these heirloom carrots for Thanksgiving this year.

This week

This week

While I am enjoying this massive project of mine, I’m also looking forward to being done and having just maintenance to worry about. There will always be weeding to do. There will always be flowers that die off and need to be replaced. But there will not always be this huge multiple month weed-fest and border building and replanting. Also come spring this flower bed is going to be breathtaking.

When the weather forces me, at long last, indoors I have some home repair and improvement projects that I intend to get going. I’m not sure where I’ll start just yet, but there is plenty to be done to improve our home.

I also need to get working on my next cosplay. It ain’t going to make itself and comic con season is right around the corner. K.

A Nerd In The Garden: Weeding, Iris and More Math (Math Is Fun)

Iris Saved

Weeding and building in the upper left corner

Weeding and building in the upper left corner

In previous blog posts I’ve mentioned that the verge on the side of the driveway is fairly large. This week I did a rough measurement of it’s area and it’s approximately 400 square feet. This was a fairly easy calculation that follows a well known formula. My driveway is approximately 40 feet long and the verge is approximately 10 feet wide. 40 X 10 = 400. Your units are feet and feet X feet = Square Feet. Putting it all together: 40 ft X 10 ft = 400 sq ft.

Before weeding 11/7/15

Before weeding 11/7/15

There’s about 60 sq ft up by the garage that I have not included in this measurement. There are two reasons for that. 1) the utilities are there and I don’t want to damage or block them. 2) Due to the layout that area gets very little sun so not a lot of plants will grow there. With these two things being the case I’ve decided to wait on that bit and see if I get inspired. Also I cleaned that up once earlier this year and mulched a good part of it. It should just need some follow up and maintenance.

After weeding 11/7/15

After weeding 11/7/15

This week I weeded around a 10 ft square space. My neighbor offered to let me use a tool to make the weeding easier but I chose to do it by hand. Not because I love backbreaking work but because I know there are some gorgeous Iris languishing in that part of the bed and I wanted to salvage what I could of them. The Iris have been overgrown for so many years that I didn’t expect too many of them to even have survived.

So far it is looking very good for the Iris. I’ve found quite a few rhizomes that had growth on them and could be saved and replanted. This will save a ton of money since I can plant them in areas where there aren’t currently flowers.

Iris Saved

Iris Saved

My goal is to clear the area along the east side of the flower bed and plant the Crocosima there. The neighbors like the idea of some kind of screen between us and the sword shaped leaves of the Crocosima get to be around 4.5 ft tall. In front of them I want to put the blue Dutch Iris I ordered and some bearded Iris. There is enough room in that bed with 10 feet on the cross section to put some shorter flowers in front of those without crowding them.

I want to keep the Crocosima because the hummingbirds love them and I love seeing the hummingbirds. Also they naturalize beautifully. The Crocosima also give the garden a bright spot of color that lasts long after the spring tulips have faded.

You might wonder about that cardboard that is down on the ground there. It’s a very good mulch and weed barrier. It’s cheap since you can use boxes you already have, rather than throwing them away and it cuts down on the grass and weeds that grow back. It also biodegrades. Right now it is protecting the bare soil from erosion due to the rain and from bad compression as I walk on it. Once I have the area planted I’ll put down the hazelnut shell mulch that I like but for now cardboard boxes work great.

It started raining so I didn’t get a picture but I scraped the mud off of some more bricks on the pathway on the west side of the house. I’ll need one of the border bricks I bought cut because I need a piece of one in two places. I called my local Home Depot and they didn’t have the equipment to cut concrete. I’ll have to see if my neighbor has something. Otherwise I may have to buy a different kind of border brick that is the size I need for the two spaces.

Next week I plan to do the other side of the walkway border and finish cleaning up the raised bed garden out back. Today I pulled the last of the tomato plants and put them in the compost bin. I need to rake the beds, do a final weeding and put landscaping fabric over them. Then they can rest for the rest of the winter.

Lastly this weekend I scraped some of the weeds out from the expansion joints in the driveway. There is a lot of work to do there and it is hard work. Like the large flower bed, I’m tackling it a little bit at a time. There is a lot to do, it’s true, but chipping away at it a little bit at a time will see it all done. And I still have time to get some writing done. K.

Weeds in expansion joints

Weeds in expansion joints

Scraped out of the joints with a tool

Scraped out of the joints with a tool

A Nerd In The Garden: The Rains Have Come

After weeding for the day

Before weeding

Before weeding

This week the rainy season got started in ernest. It began with a day of spritzing and grew slightly heavier each day until we have a steady all day rain falling. It might be tempting to think it’s time to put the gardening tools away and relax but now is the perfect time to weed out the large flower bed. The steady rains have made the soil soft enough to get the roots out with the weeds. Getting as many of the roots as possible will keep the return weed numbers way down. It also creates more room in the soil for the roots of the flowers planted in the bed.

Over the years the large flower bed has become overrun with weeds and grasses. I’m embarrassed to post pictures of it but in the interest of demonstrating the transformation, photos will be posted.

After weeding for the day

After weeding for the day


For weeding in the rain a good raincoat, work gloves and work boots are a good idea. I also use a tool that is a combination cat’s claw and hoe. With the ground wet a cardboard box, broken down makes for a good knee guard and after an area has been weeded it can be placed on the now bare ground to prevent grasses from growing back.

Last time I spoke of budgeting time as carefully as you budget money. Looking at the large flower bed, and honestly it is really just a strip on the side of the driveway that I’ve decided will be a flower bed, it would be easy to be overwhelmed by the enormity of the task. What does this have to do with budgeting time? Well when I first started the project I decided I could budget 2 hours of time each weekend to landscaping and gardening. Two hours is about all you’d want to spend out in the rain doing weeding even with a good raincoat and gloves. Two hours a week will be enough to chip away at the weeds and have the whole thing beautiful and ready to go by spring.

Border holding strong

Border holding strong

The border we installed last week is holding very well. The silt has not covered the stones we cleaned off from that side. In the photo silt has covered the other side where the border hasn’t yet been installed. When it isn’t raining so hard, or when I haven’t worked overtime we will install the other side.

I counted up the bricks left and we will need more to do the other side of the walkway. Fortunately purchasing a few at a time spreads the cost out and makes it more affordable.

There will be plenty to do in the garden and flower bed until the weather gets too bad to work in it. The raised beds still need to finish being winterized. That might be next week too. K.